We can find soil everywhere on the earth, and all soils have a unique character. Even in big cities where the ground is paved over with asphalt, there is certainly a unique soil that has a relationship to the place.

In my studio in London, I produce my pieces through the everyday process of wheel throwing and kiln firing. However, I use clay packed in a plastic bag I bought through mail order.

Ceramic industries all over the world have always developed where people could find a certain soil that is suitable for their production. In older times, I assume, the character of each soil created the important characteristics of the ceramics that were produced in the area.

While I was thinking about this matter on my way to the studio in the morning, I strongly felt like using the soil which was lying under my feet for my pots. However, the soil in London does not seem to be good for pottery making because of its lack of stickiness. This means it is difficult to produce forms, and they cannot withstand high-temperature firing. I repeated my research, blending the soil grabbed from around my studio with sticky clay.

The challenge in this exhibition is to express the unique texture of London soil in my miniature pots.